carrotShould I Eat Carrots For My Eyes? Does Reading In The Dark Harm My Eyes?

Have you ever wondered how many of the eye myths were true that you heard when you were growing up or perhaps are still true nowadays? At some point, I’m sure someone in your family told you “If you sit too close to the TV, you’ll hurt your eyes” Or “Eat lots of carrots to help your eyes”. Take it from your trusted Indianapolis Eyeglasses expert, Dr. Amy Walden, and Associates to put an end to the myths and focus on the truths of the things you may have read or heard.

Myth: Sitting to close to the television will harm your eyes

Fact: The big picture of this myth seems to be the common sense approach. If you need to sit super close to the TV or any object, you are probably experiencing some sort of vision problem. These symptoms may indicate that you are experiencing nearsightedness. Nearsightedness is an eye condition in which you can view objects up close clearly, but things farther away may appear blurry. These are signs that you should consult your eye doctor about getting new Indianapolis Eyeglasses. But, there has not been any scientific proof that your eyes are harmed if you sit too close to the TV.

Myth: Reading in low light or in the dark will harm your eyes

Fact: Your eyes tend to work harder and may feel heavy or tired when you read in the dark or low lighting. But there is no proof that this causes harm to your eyes long term.

Myth: Eating carrots improves your vision

Fact: Carrots contain beta-carotene, which allows the bottom to produce vitamin A. Vitamin A helps the eye convert light into a signal that is then transmitted to the brain. This allows people to see under low light conditions. The cornea can disappear if the body does not obtain any vitamin A. That is why in poorer areas or countries where people are not able to receive large quantities of vitamin A, they become blind or have vision problems. There is not a lot known about the number of carrots to eat that you can eat to help improve your eyes, but there are many food sources that can produce Vitamin A. So eating carrots and other sources of Vitamin A, will give your body the nutrients it needs, but eating a lot of carrots isn’t going to give you 20/20 vision or only help you see in the dark.

Myth: Trying on another’s person’s glasses will harm your eyes

Fact: Trying on someone’s Indianapolis Eyeglasses will cause your eyes to work differently then they would if you had your glasses on. But when you remove the other glasses, your eyes will adjust back to normal.

Myth: Staring directly at the sun will not harm your eyes

Fact: It is never a good idea to stare directly at the sun. Ultra-violet rays can cause damage to your eyes and not even sunglasses can fully protect your eyes from the sun’s harmful rays. Another note is to avoid staring at a solar eclipse, this can cause permanent damage to your eyes.

Myth: Having a yearly eye exam is only necessary if you are having vision problems.

Fact: This is false! There are many eye diseases that do not even show any symptoms. Early detection is critical, so no further damage occurs to your eyes. It is very important to schedule a yearly eye exam to avoid harm to your eyes. Reviewing your Indianapolis Eyeglasses or contact lens prescription is important even if it doesn’t seem necessary.

Myth: Children with crossed-eyes will eventually grow out of this

Fact: When a child or anyone for that matter has crossed-eyes, this is a condition called strabismus. To correct this an eye patch, eye drops, Indianapolis Eyeglasses, and sometimes even surgery is needed. The sooner this is dealt with, the better for best results for the overall health of the eyes.

Have more questions about eye myths or Indianapolis Eyeglasses? Contact Dr. Amy Walden & Associates Today

If you have any further questions about any eye myths or questions in general about your overall eye health or updating your Indianapolis Eyeglasses prescription please feel free to give Dr. Amy Walden & Associates call today. Anyone of our friendly eye doctors can help you get the answers you need.